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College of 21st Century Services

      
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College of 21st Century Services
Dean Mark Krause, CFuE

How do you respond to a family who says, "We don't want a traditional funeral?" You'll learn how to go beyond tradition with innovative offerings and become certified as a funeral celebrant trained to provide meaningful alternatives to clergy-led services.

 

Friday, July 18

2 - 4:30 p.m.
Registration and Check-in

4:30 - 5 p.m.
Orientation

5 - 6 p.m.
University Reception

6 p.m.
University Dinner

 

Saturday, July 19

8 - 8:45 a.m.
Breakfast

8:45 - 9 a.m.
Introductions
Mark Krause, CFuE

9 - 10:30 a.m.
A $28,000 Wedding vs. Your Final Celebration
Allen Dave Jr.
According to WeddingStats.org, there are about 2.6 million weddings conducted each year in the United States, and the average cost of a wedding in 2014 is projected to be $28,671. What makes a $28,000 wedding a perceived value, one on which consumers willingly spend significantly more than on our services?

Find out how Allen Dave made the transition from wedding planner to final event planner, bringing wedding planning practices and hospitality to funeral service. Want to hear how his lack of preconceived notions and "we always did it this way" rationale put him ahead of his competition and gained him customers in a highly competitive market?

10:30 - 11 a.m.
Break

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Which Casket Would You Like With Those Chicken Wings?
Mark Krause, CFuE
Including the 42 percent of their customers who select cremation, Krause Funeral Homes & Cremation Service find that up to 80 percent of all their customers opt for the hospitality of food in their plans for final tribute. How did that evolve? What exactly does Krause offer? And what type of revenue stream does that consumer-driven service enhancement generate?

Learn how Krause made the connection between food service and funeral service and then designed and delivered what his customers wanted. Discover additional similar types of service enhancements the firm is using to help create meaningful tributes. 

12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch

1:30 - 3 p.m.
No Ceremony, No Memorialization: Our Failure, Our Fault
Ernie Heffner, CFuE
The phenomina of direct dispostion, no ceremony and no memorialization is the result of our profession’s failure to be relevant with contemporary consumers. Heffner will present a comprehensive overview of demographic realities and how one might increase a firm’s relevancy with today’s consumers. This curriculum provides the outline for taking a proactive approach to 21st century end of life activities and better serving families who may otherwise have elected no ceremony, no memorialization. This program explores and reviews:

  • the correlation between no ceremony, no memorialization and demographic realities
  • how celebrant ceremonies can boost market share
  • the investment required for training and educating management and staff
  • operational logistics and time commitments for celebrant ceremonies
  • where to expect pushback: who needs to be on the bus and who needs get off the bus
  • meaningful messaging and methods for educating the public
  • the relevant connection with hospice

For those with closed minds, the undeniable truth in this session is less than pleasant to consider. However, those with open minds will feel invigorated with renewed enthusiasm about the bright future and opportunity before them.

3 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 5 p.m.
70 Percent of Services Are Conducted by Eternal Hills Staff ... Not Clergy!
Tim Lancaster, CCFE
Want to know how this came to be? Think there is any connection between Eternal Hills' 60 percent market share against three competitors and their approach to providing meaningful services?

Operating in a market with a cremation rate ranging from 55 to 68 percent, Tim Lancaster will lead you through a process that has resulted in 70 percent of consumers choosing to have Eternal Hills professionals conduct the service rather than clergy. The real key and focus is not on product but rather on communication.

According to customer surveys, Eternal Hills has exponentially greater satisfaction when their own staff conduct services than when they leave their business and future in the hands of a preacher. What's more, though they charge $200 for celebrant services, families still try to give the celebrant a gratuity personally after the service.

Critically important is the attitude and approach of the arranger, which leads to consideration of permanent memorialization being important to the customer. This success story is not just theory but real how-to instruction on "why we do what we do" and "how we have applied these theories.”

And, finally, in the case of more traditional denominations that hold services at Eternal Hills, the staff acts as the "master of ceremonies" and incorporates the traditional clergy into the service rather than just handing him or her the reins.

5 p.m.
Dinner

7 - 9 p.m.
Annual Sports Tournament
Join your ICCFAU colleagues for a friendly game of volleyball.

 

Sunday, July 20

8 - 9 a.m.
Breakfast

9 - 10:30 a.m.
Celebrant Training
Doug Manning and Glenda Stansbury
Celebrants offer an alternative to services provided by clergy persons for those families who are not affiliated with a church or who do not wish to have a traditional religious funeral service. They design services that are completely personal, incorporating those unique stories, songs and experiences that defined the deceased.

Celebrants schedule a special "Family Time" meeting when the family can share memories, anecdotes and defining moments in the loved one's life. They will then base the essence of the service on the remembrances of the family, and family and friends will be encouraged to participate.

Celebrants develop a library of resources available for readings, music, ceremonies and personal touches. They consult with the family to help them choose elements of the service that reflect their loved one. They are bound by a Code of Ethics for complete confidentiality in all dealings with the family.

Becoming a Certified Celebrant
After completing this college, students will be certified as celebrants. The training for celebrants as established by the In-Sight Institute seeks to provide the most comprehensive and sensitive training available for people who wish to develop this as a profession or to add to their current job description. It is important that a family knows they are being served by someone who understands the process and is prepared to offer the very best funeral possible.
What Does This Service Cost Families?
The celebrant fee is usually higher than the fees charged by clergy. They can range widely across the country from $200 to more than $800, depending on type of service, location, travel and other expenses. A celebrant spends approximately 10 hours preparing for each service, as well as the expenses of training and maintaining a resource library.

What is The In-Sight Institute?
The In-Sight Institute has one mission: helping people help people. This has evolved over the years, expanding from grief care books and seminars to include celebrant training and certification. Founder Doug Manning is a best-selling author, sought-after speaker and a grief expert relied on by the media. His first book, "A Minister Speaks About Funerals," was self-published in 1978, and in 1979, he wrote his best-selling book, "Don't Take My Grief Away From Me." In 1983, Manning wrote "When Love Gets Tough: The Nursing Home Decision." With the success of that book, he made the commitment to change careers and founded In-Sight Books as his publishing and seminar company.

In-Sight Books now publishes more than 40 products by Manning and select authors. The In-Sight Institute is the training arm of the company.

10:30 - 11 a.m.
Break

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)
  

12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch

1:30 - 3 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)
 

3 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 5 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)
 

5 p.m.
Dinner

 

Monday, July 21

8 - 9 a.m.
Breakfast

9 - 10:30 a.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

10:30 - 11 a.m.
Break

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch

1:30 - 3 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

3 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 5 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

6 p.m.
Dinner

7 p.m.
Cryptones concert

 

Tuesday, July 22

Class pictures will be taken on Tuesday

8 - 9 a.m.
Breakfast

9 - 10:30 a.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

10:30 - 11 a.m.
Break

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Lunch

1:30 - 3 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd) 

3 - 3:30 p.m.
Break

3:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Celebrant Training (cont'd)

4:30 - 6 p.m.
Graduation/Reception for Students Completing Four Years

 

Wednesday, July 23

8 - 9 a.m.
Breakfast

9 - 10 a.m.
Summary Panel/Q&A with All Professors

10 a.m.
Presentation of Certified Celebrant Certificate and Class Diploma